Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
  •  
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Woes of Reclaiming Screens Disappear with a Dunk Tank

    What if I told you that there's a way to make reclaiming undemanding? A method that could remove the dread when it's time to reclaim screens, the hours spent in the washout booth, and the ache of sore muscles from all the scrubbing? The Dunk Tank (also known as a Dip Tank) streamlines the reclaiming process effortlessly and painlessly.

    Learn More: https://www.screenprinting.com/blogs...th-a-dunk-tank

  • #2
    Can anyone speak to the buildup of emulsion that happens at the bottom of the tank? I used to use one and loved it. When it came time to move the shop, we had to empty the tank for transportation. When we emptied it, there was a large blob of blue emulsion (chromablue) at the bottom. We were not expecting that and did not know what to do with it. So some questions.

    Is it normal for it to accumulate that much buildup? Its hard to describe how big or heavy it was. It was probably around 7-10 lbs. Unfortunately I do not remember how long it took for that much buildup. It may have been a year or a little less than that. It was a small shop so not a ton going through the tank.

    If this is normal, what does one do with that much buildup? Do you let it dry out in the sun and then just throw it in the trash?

    I want to start using my dip tank again, but do not want to end up with a blob like that again. Thanks for reading.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Spencer,

      Depending on the emulsion type - yes. It will be normal for some of the emulsion to fall off in the dip tank and settle at the bottom. Cleaning the dip tank a couple times a year - usually when you are replacing the chemistry is a good thing to plan for. Other emulsions, like Cryocoat, will remain largely intact and very little residue will end up on the bottom of the tank.

      As for the giant blue blob you have - yes, spread it out on some cardboard and let it get completely dry. At that point you can send it to the landfill.

      Comment

      Sorry, you are not authorized to view this page

      About the Author

      Collapse

      slarson10
      slarson10
      Administrator
      Find out more about slarson10

      Top Active Users

      Collapse

      There are no top active users.
      Working...
      X